St. John the Baptist Statue at Mission San Juan Bautista, California

If you visit the Spanish mission in the town of San Juan Bautista (San Benito County in Central California), you will see this statue on the church grounds.

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Because most statues of saints are depicted fully clothe, the statue is sometimes thought of as a Native American.

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But it is actually a statue of St. John the Baptist, whom the town is named after – Spanish version, San Juan Bautista.

For this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge, host Cheri Lucas posted:

Artists are inspired by and capture the world around us: sculptors immortalize people with statues; painters record events in their masterpieces. What about the other way around? For this week’s theme, find inspiration in a piece of art, and go further: imitate it.

While I don’t have a photo that imitates this particular statue of John the Baptist, I thought the photo fit the theme.

There are many historical paintings depicting St. John, partly clothe, just as in this statue.

And if you are not familiar with the religious tradition of baptism, the reason for the depiction of St. John in this manner is because baptism ceremonies were originally done in water.  Those receiving baptism were naked.

Most of the paintings and historical depictions of St. John had him partially clothe.

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So another question for me is also…how long does art continue to imitate other art?

What do you think?


Here are more photos from the San Juan Bautista Mission — which continues as an active parish today — and in need of funds for restoration projects.

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Field behind the San Juan Bautista Mission

From the website OldMissionSJB.org:

Mission San Juan Bautista was founded on June 24, 1797 and has seen a lot of wear and damage over the centuries.

The building is in need of earthquake retrofitting to guarantee survival from the inevitable shocks coming from the nearby San Andreas Fault.  There are items of great historic and artistic value in need of restoration, cleaning, and archival display. There is much that can be done to improve the educational and interpretive information in the museum and the church.


Related Post on Lola Jane’s World Blog:

An (Extra)ordinary dog and ordinary objects for the (Extra)ordinary Photo Challenge

For this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge, host Cheri Lucas asks us to keep our eyes open and to look for beauty or interestingness where we least expect it.

I’ve taken more close-up photos recently, and I think these ordinary scenes fit the theme, perhaps looking more extra-ordinary when observed up close.

From our Australian Shepherd dog — now 15, who allows me to get up close to him and admire the color and texture of his fur.  In his younger days, he would have been restless and playful, making him hard to photograph, unless he was asleep of course…

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To ordinary brush bristles…

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Dying pine needles, bark and tar…

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And more ordinary objects like an old, peeling yard dust pan handle with this odd image…

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I suppose anything can be (extra)ordinary if we stop and observe, and appreciate.

And maybe my sadness, knowing that our dog’s time with us is nearing an end, reflects the mood of the other photos for this post.

To join in this week’s theme, click here.


Related: A post about how we name our dogs. featuring Mr. Aussie Dog, photographed below in his younger days with my first-born grandson, Jun.

Grandson Jun with Tucker

Grandson Jun with Tucker

WordPress Photo Challenge – Change

The theme for this week’s photo challenge — which I have not participated in since my last post of the summer — is change.

I love the quote that host Kristin Snow of SnowMads.com included for the post: Change Quote Lao TzuThe photographs that came to mind is the change from day to night, and these sunset photographs captured while my niece was visiting last month.

They were taken where Ocean Avenue ends (to a popular beach spot) in the town of Carmel-By-The-Sea, California.

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Before dark, couples and families make their way to the beach to find the perfect spot to see the sun setting…

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And zooming in closer to the water’s edge, I snapped another couple holding hands and watching the sunset…with their feet in the glowing Pacific Ocean water.

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It was a beautiful day, capped by a gorgeous, perfect sunset.

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I look forward to crafting new posts for the fall, and catching up on reading posts from my favorite blogs and bloggers.

Happy Friday, Happy September, Happy Fall…and a welcome to the changing season.

To participate in this weekly WordPress Photo Challenge, click here.

From natural fiber old fishing nets to the sunset for the Half and Half photo challenge

I’ve learned a lot more about photography since joining the WordPress Photo Challenges.  I’m starting to take more detailed photos, which is  interesting and a lot of fun.

This week’s challenge theme from Ben Huberman is Half and Half and asked participants to share an image that has two clear halves, literally or figuratively.

I like this photo of an old natural fiber fishing net draped over a fence…

Half old natural fiber fishing net

The lichen growing on the net added even more interest to the netting pattern.

Before the invention of nylon fish nets, this type of netting would just decompose in the ocean if lost at sea.  Unfortunately, that is not the case with today’s synthetic fishing materials, which adds to the big problem of marine trash in our oceans.

This photo of a new lock / old lock fits the theme…

New and old half and half

And this brightly painted fence and creeping plants…

Half Fench

Black bird on a roof…

Top half bird 1

And half and half themed photo of the ever-present and invasive iceplants in front of Coast Indian Paintbrush flowers (at least that is what I think these red flowers are)…P1210744

Silhouette of the top of a young Monterey Bay cypress pine tree at sunset…

Cypress silhouette over dunes

And my last half / half photo entry is of the sun setting behind the sand dunes.

Sunset over dunes

To take part in this week’s challenge and to see submissions for this photo challenge theme, click here.

Door photographs for the Weekly WordPress Photo Challenge

While not particularly pretty, I like this door to California’s first brick house because the structure still exist — still standing, and I like the contrast of the fading white paint and the red-orange hued bricks.  It is located in downtown Monterey, and part of the State Park buildings in “oldtown”Door at First Brick House California 1

You will find many interesting doors and doorways in the historic, downtown Monterey area.  Here are a few…

Door related details are also fun to photograph…

A few door photographs in the little town of Moss Landing, California (the red doors to the Old Post Office, door to a railroad car, parked at the Haute Enchilada restaurant and art gallery, and an antique store, with details in the following gballery).

And broken down or missing doors, at the barracks of the old Fort Ord military base in the Monterey bay…  These buildings will soon be demolished to make way for new housing developments and shopping / office / university buildings.

A favorite door related photo are the banners above the entrance to the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory.

Entrance to Moss Landing Marine Laboratory

A great reminder for all of us, to take time each day for the things we love to do… whatever doorway we enter or leave from.

Note: You can see more photos from the open house post at the Moss Landing Marine Laboratory here, including  their “internet famous” blob fish.


Posted for the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge theme “Door”

The Los Angeles Spread

Whenever I had to do work in Los Angeles in my prior job,  I often elected to drive (from Northern California) instead of booking a flight and flying into LAX.

My rationale was by the time I drove to the airport, parked, shuttled, waited, flew, picked up a rental car, I am really only gaining 1 1/2 to 2 hours of travel time.  I didn’t mind the easy drive, and liked the alone time and being in my own space.

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Downtown L.A. buildings visible from this shot…

On the way to see my sisters in the East Coast last fall, my flight had a layover in LAX and I took these photos.

The view from above gave me a good perspective of the size of the greater Los Angeles area, and an appreciation for why it was easy to feel disoriented in such a big city.

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Higher up, L.A.’s downtown high rises blend into the wider landscape

Population wise, L.A. is the second largest metropolitan area in the U.S., after New York.

With over 13 million people, Los Angeles has the distinction of being the most populous city in California.  The Greater Los Angeles area has over 18 million people, making it the most populous county in the United States.

Cities similar in size to Los Angeles are London, Buenos Aires, and Dhaka in Bangladesh.

Southern California coast Leaving LAX

Leaving LAX – Southern California coastline

Post for the weekly WordPress Photo Challenge theme from Michelle W,  “On the Way”:

For this week’s photo challenge, stop and photograph the metaphorical roses (or the literal tulips). Share a shot of something you saw, did, or experienced on the way: a photo not of your destination, but of an interesting thing along the way. Show us something stunning others might have missed, or find some unexpected beauty in a mundane moment. Maybe we can all start looking at the in-betweens a bit differently!

So while my destination was the East Coast, I appreciated seeing Los Angeles. this time…from above.

WPC: Early Bird – Sunrise and Philippine pandan leaf sellers

My favorite time of the day is right after sunset — the twilight (“takip-silim” in the Philippine Tagalog language, takip meaning to cover, and silim means dusk). I am definitely not a morning person.

Earlier this year, I did see some amazing sunrises.  Luckily, I was awake and aware enough to appreciate the moment and snap some photos on my phone camera, with pine trees in silhouette…

Monterey Bay Area (California) Sunrise Photos

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Philippine Pandan Leaf Sellers Sunrise Photos

Though I am not a morning person, one has to wake up pretty early if you want to buy leaves at the market where Philippine pandan leaves — called “romblon” in our region — are sold.

Here are a few of my photos of pandan leaf sellers unloading their banka (outrigger) boats and bringing in bundles of leaves to sell at the weekly market.  They usually pull in from surrounding islands right before sunrise.

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More versions of my pandan leaf seller photos arriving for market day are posted on the Native Leaf website, here (posted for the Golden Hour photo challenge).

Romblon Leaf "Bayongs" (Market Totes Bags)

Romblon Leaf “Bayongs” (Market Totes Bags)

And if you are curious about what products can be made from the  leaves of the pandan plant, in addition to its use in Asian and Pacific islands for cooking and food flavoring, see this LolaKo.com post: Philippine Romblon (Pandanus) plant or click on the market totes – Philippine bayong photo.

To participate in this week’s WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge (WPC) theme of “Early Bird” or to see entries for this challenge, click here.

Early Bird Challenge theme guidelines, from

Whether it’s an unforgettable sunrise, that warm glow that only comes from early morning light, or just the lack of other people walking through your shot, early birding can pay real dividends in your photographs.

This week (and especially if you’re among those who find the early bird concept cringe-worthy), I encourage you to set your alarm for the early hours, grab your first (several) cups of coffee, and challenge yourself to capture an outstanding photograph in the early morning light.

WPC Orange 2: California’s First Brick House

Californias 1st brick building Monterey State Historic ParkCalifornia’s first “fired brick” house —  part of the Monterey State Historic Park’s buildings in downtown old Monterey — also fits right in the WordPress Photo Challenge theme of orange.

The house was built in 1847.  Before construction of this brick structure, most homes in the area were made from adobe — blocks of sun-dried mud.

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From the HistoricMonterey.org website:

All Monterey’s early structures were built of adobe (sun-dried mud) blocks. Walls as thick as three feet were needed to support second story floors.

Adobe buildings required plastering on exterior surfaces to keep out damaging winter rains, otherwise the walls were likely to crumble.

 In 1847, Gallant Dickerson arrived in Monterey to introduce a new building technique to California: the art of fired clay brickmaking. Fired brick’s increased strength allowed multiple-storied buildings with standard wall widths; fired brick was also water-resistant and required little or no surface treatment.

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Dickerson fired thousands of clay blocks into rock-hard bricks, and with them built one of the first fired-brick buildings in California. He completed only the portion of First Brick House that stands today before moving his family to the Sierra Nevadas in search of gold.

To see other entries and interpretations on the photo theme orange, click here.

WPC Reward: The longevity of author John Steinbeck – photos from his hometown

Yesterday. February 27, was the author John Steinbeck’s birthday (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) — a good occasion to post my Oldtown Salinas photos and submit my 2nd WordPress Photo Challenge on the theme of Reward, for the reward of longevity.

Longevity: long life – the fact of living for many years – length of life – the length of time that something or someone lasts or continues (Definition from the Merriam-Webster dictionary)

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Steinbeck’s words carved into stone at entrance of National Steinbeck Center

Among the rewards for a life well-lived is physical longevity and what is left, well after death.

John Steinbeck was born in Salinas, Monterey County, California.  He wrote 27 books and won both a Pulitzer and the National Book Award for his novel, The Grapes of Wrath.  He also won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962 (controversial at the time) for “the most outstanding work in an ideal direction”  and “realistic and imaginative writing, combining as it does sympathetic humor and keen social perception”.

Salinas is the largest city in Monterey County, and the county seat.  It has a population of 155,000 and is located 8 miles from the Pacific Ocean.

The mild weather and rich valley soil is why the area is called “the salad bowl of the world”.  It is the only county in the United States that produces more than $1 billion annually in vegetable sales.

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This was taken last week…really! The weather is so mild here, that there is something growing in the fields most of the time.

 

Much of Steinbeck’s writing is set in Southern and Central California, particularly the Salinas Valley and the Central California Coast.

The photos below are from “Old Town” Salinas, location of the National Steinbeck Center.  The house where John Steinbeck was born is a few blocks away from Oldtown. 

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Buildings in the Victorian style of architecture dot the old town Salinas downtown area.

Here are some examples of the buildings, walking out from the National Steinbeck Center…

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Some of the building details in Oldtown…

And some interesting tile work on a few of the entryways…

And finally, some scenes from  the stores and restaurants in Oldtown…

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The old town Salinas library is a few blocks away and is named after John Steinbeck.

There is another of the rock (like the one in front of the Steinbeck Center) carved with his quote, outside the library…

 

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In addition to tips learned on the WordPress Photo Challenges, these series of photos were also inspired by Cardinal Guzman’s new photo challenge The Changing Seasons “to train your eye”.

This is my first attempt at taking a series of photos of one place, and it certainly made me look up/down and check out details, which I think in general makes me a better observer of what is around me…of life.

I’m inspired by photography that captures a sense of place and people, especially vibrant photos from The Third Eye Mom (see Lesson in Street Photography), and intricate nature photos, and great landscape photography from Just Another Nature Enthusiast (see the EcoRegion series).

In our digital era and through our blogs, we all have the opportunity for the “reward” of longevity — since our words and photos will be around long after we are gone, right?

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To see interpretations from the WordPress blogging community or to join in the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

To participate in the new monthly photo challenge, The Changing Seasons, hosted by Cardinal Guzman, click here.  NOTE: I’m also including these photos as my first attempt and as practice 🙂 for this monthly challenge (though late, and more photos than suggested) since I like the idea of capturing sets of photos for different seasons — plus these photos are not archived, or published elsewhere, but taken last week. 

Seeing amazing photos from the WordPress blogging community is always inspiring, and tips are always appreciated from seasoned and professional photographers.

WPC – Martial Arts Black Belt Reward

The theme for this week’s WordPress Photo Challenge from Krista is Reward.

Reward is filthy with possibility: it could be your third grader’s beaming smile after reading her first chapter book, a steaming mug of chicken soup after a long run in the cold, a photo of your brand-new baby — your reward for patience during nine months of construction, or your extended family gathered around the dinner table.

Jun White BeltJun, my oldest grandson, started taking Taekwondo – a martial art that originated in Korea over 2,000 years ago and an Olympics sport  — when he was 5 years old.

In the span of time that he has taken Taekwondo classes, I probably have thousands of photos of him…and the one at right was taken for his first day of class, as a “white belt”.

Over the years, I’ve watched him learn and memorize his poomsaes (the forms learned for each belt level), learn advancing degrees of self-defense techniques, sparring, and grow from a shy to a more confident young man.

So the reward for his dedication and our  family’s support of his martial arts lessons?

Last summer, shortly before his 10th birthday, he received his black belt.

Black Belt Ceremony

Above and below, part of the invitation to the Black Belt Graduation Ceremony…Invite TKD GraduationBlack Belt Ceremony.jpg 1Black Belt Ceremony 2

Black Belt Ceremony 3

Jun at TKD Competition

The black belt itself is a reward for sticking with martial arts training, and to understand that practice and dedication makes you better.

My hope is that my grandson will continue to learn that anything you put your effort and focus in, over time, will have its own rewards….beyond a belt color.

Can you tell how proud I am of this young person?

To see interpretation for this WordPress blogging community weekly photo challenge, click here.

WPC: Rule of Thirds – The frog and a sand dollar

This little frog (about the size of a thumb) is a Sierran Treefrog (Pseudacris sierra), formerly called Pacific Treefrog or Pacific Chorus Frog and was not living in a tree, but at the time, an unused spa in our backyard.

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It was in a crevice so I did not really have much of a choice but to shoot through the slit near the heating element area, making the photo naturally follow the rule of third, and a little of the “bokeh” that Jen discusses for the challenge .

I did not have to crop the frog photo above, and slightly cropped the one below.

Sierran Tree Frog

And here is one with my grandson Jun showing me a sand dollar that washed up during a beach visit.   I think I could have adjusted the shot slightly for more of the 1/3 rule here…

Jun holding sand dollar

The rule of 3rd is something basic that I do think about now when composing photographs.  And as far as the “bokeh” shots I’ll definitely look to improve and experiment with…so thank you WP Photo Challenges!

So, I think these photos capture the WordPress Photo Challenge this week…what do you think?

A note on frogs from my earlier post:

You may have heard that frogs are considered indicator species, or animal sentinels, and a sort of planetary canary.

Frogs have thin skins that are permeable to water, and lay their eggs in bodies of water.  Perhaps because of this,  they are sensitive to pollutants and other problems with the environment.

It is comforting to know the little frogs survive in our backyard, despite the large presence of big business agriculture in our county (Monterey is the only county in the United States with more than 1 BILLION in annual vegetable sales).

Though these frogs are not endangered, frog populations can decline quite quickly.

For more, please visit California Herps – A Guide to the Amphibians and Reptiles of California

To see amazing interpretations and beautiful photography showcasing the rule of thirds and the “bokeh” concept, click here.

WordPress Photo Challenge – resting dragonfly shadow

I enjoy WordPress photo challenges and continue to pick up great tips — in addition to seeing stunning photographs by fellow bloggers — through these challenges.

The theme for the second challenge in 2015 is Shadowed, from Jen Hooks…

For this week’s Photo Challenge, find the shadows. You can choose a literal interpretation and shoot an actual shadow, or you can play with the light and dark, and create a moody scene, or capture your subject in a rich and interesting way.

Dragonfly Shadow web

I have yet to experiment with shadows and low lighting, so I am submitting my shot of a dragonfly and its shadow, resting on a Native Leaf wine bag (which I posted on the NL blog).  Excerpt:

Dragonflies are ancient insects and there are 28 species of dragonflies and damselflies in the San Francisco Bay area.

Looking at the Wildlife of the San Francisco Bay Area website, it looks like this particular one is a Blue-eyed Darner – Rhionaeschna multicolor.

I remember chasing after vibrantly colored dragonflies when I was a kid growing up in the Philippines.  There was a house near us with an abandoned pool and what must have been perfect breeding grounds for them, as dragonflies and damselflies begin their lives living underwater for a year of more as nymphs (eating lots of mosquito).  No wonder there were so many dragonflies in that area!

Of course back then, we did not worry that one of our playmates might fall in the algae, leaf-filled tannin brown (and rather deep) water…we just had fun and ran after the shiny dragonflies.

Why save a dragonfly

Information from the US Fish & Wildlife website Endangered Species Fact Sheet

Did you grow up seeing dragonflies and where there myths about dragonflies in your culture?

Do you still see them where you now live?

WordPress Photo Challenge Reflections: cactus, black oak and well cover

Here is my submission for the WordPress Photo Challenge – reflections, inspiration from Ben, whose beautiful photos are posted on his blog, Flights, Camera, Satisfaction.

My three reflection photos:

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Saguaro Cactus grown from seed, mirror reflection.  Saguaros can live up to 150 years, and at about 75 years old, will grow an arm (called a spear).  Click on the photo to view post.

Being open to appreciating new things, such as for plants I did not care for in the past, like cactus…which are actually amazing plants.

Springtime California Black Oak

To be in the moment to appreciate reflections of time.  Spring is my favorite time of the year, and a great time to photograph trees like the California Black Oak sprouting light green leaves…

Well-Cover-Detail-Larkin-House reflection

And reflection from the well water that shows off details of its metal cover (also used in the WordPress photo challenge, resolved to pay attention to — .and to capture more details in my photographs.)

And about that cactus on the photograph… It is now 18 years old and was grown from seed.  If you are curious to know how long cactus seeds keep (or are viable)…check out the comment section on Lolako.com’s “Contact” page, here.   Can you guess?

  • over 20 years?
  • over 200 years?
  • or for over 2,000 years?

WordPress Photo Challenge – Patterns of colors in costumes

After a hiatus from participating in my favorite WordPress blogging challenge (actually …a hiatus from blogging in general) I am submitting the following photos for this week’s theme from Sara Rosso, Patterns.

I immediately thought of the photos I took at the Marina (Monterey County, California) farmers market this past Sunday, the 5th of May.

I enjoyed the lovely costumes with repeating patterns and colors from a group performing folk dances for Cinco de Mayo.

Cinco De Mayo Color Patterns

Family Cinco De Mayo Color Patterns 1

Huddling together in preparation for their performance — and for photo opportunities — were the cutest little girl and boy, who seem to enjoy the attention and cameras pointed at them…

Family Cinco De Mayo Color Patterns 2

Cinco De Mayo Color Patterns 1Cinco De Mayo dancer at market low res

More about Baile Folklorico – traditional Latin American dances here

Cinco de Mayo events in the United States celebrates Mexican culture and heritage, and are very popular.

And of course, as with anything that can be commercialized, the popularity of Cinco de Mayo celebrations can also be attributed to beer companies promoting the event.  From the website, Hispanic Culture On-Line, Cinco de Mayo history:

The commercialization of Cinco de Mayo started because Coors Brewing Company wanted to improve its image among Hispanics who used to boycott the brewing company for alleged discriminatory practices….click here to read the article

Related article…Cinco de Mayo now a mainstream holiday, from SF Gate / San Francisco Chronicle.

Are there Cinco de Mayo events and celebrations where YOU are?

WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons…is it December?

I walked outside to see what is left of my “garden” (not much) this morning, to take photographs for the WordPress weekly photo challenge theme, Changing Seasons.

The plants looked worn, some with mold, but still, it may not be completely clear to these plants that it is already December!  Maybe a tad of the effects of global warming here?

This is the first time I’ve posted photos taken the same day as the challenge. From my phone camera this morning…

December Strawberry

A neighboring tomato branch fell over on top of some geraniums.  One more tomato will try to ripen! The lemons on track with their own schedule…

December Daisy!

Leaves are still on this tree…  Oddly, the leaves at the bottom were a different color from the red-hued leaves on the rest of the same tree.

Teeny tiny December garden snail makes its way up a ceramic pot

Jeff complains that in California, we really do not get changing seasons, and he misses — even after living here for decades now — the true four seasons experience in other regions of the United States.

I disagree…It’s rainy, it’s cold, the days are short, and we do have deciduous trees, with leaves that change color and fall off (eventually) during winter.  So YES, we indeed have changing seasons!.

The seasons are just not as pronounced as other places.  Then again, the mild weather is one of the reasons why I like it here.

There is one thing I like the least about the winter and changing season…the shorter days!  I love the height of summer, when the sun is out until 9:00 in the evening.  And now, by 5:00PM, the sun is gone.

–Updated on Sunday, December 9th:   I am adding this winter sunset photo, taken yesterday, around 4:45 PM.  And just like that, the day was over…

Wintertime sunset at Moss Landing Harbor, off California Highway 1

I just remembered, too, that I posted changing seasons, and spring time photos earlier this year (link to my green fields photo below, or here to Signs of Spring). Spring is my favorite time of the year and season.

Here are interpretations of the theme Changing Seasons from other WordPress bloggers…

  1. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Flickr Comments
  2. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Figments of a DuTchess
  3. Weekly Photo Challenge – Changing Seasons | Just Snaps
  4. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons – Joy and Woe
  5. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « « The Great Escape » Life from behind a lens
  6. Changing Seasons | Empire of Lights
  7. Changing Seasons « Fenland Photos
  8. Weekly Photo Challenge – Changing Seasons | Chittle Chattle
  9. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Ese’s Voice
  10. weekly photo challenge : changing seasons | bodhisattvaintraining
  11. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Charles Ray’s Ramblings
  12. Changing Seasons « Broken Light: A Photography Collective
  13. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Shail’s Nest
  14. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Photo & Tour
  15. Weekly Photo Challenge – Changing Country Season | Canoe Communications
  16. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Ohm Sweet Ohm
  17. weekly photo challenge: changing seasons « a nomad in the land of nizwa
  18. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « MaanKind
  19. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons / Philippine Lemon Flower in Bloom « Advocacine’s Blog
  20. Seasons Change « Spirit Lights The Way
  21. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Tasagi Designs
  22. Not the Family Business!
  23. Challenge Photo Hebdo – Les saisons se changent « Paris en photographies
  24. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « Julie Dawn Fox in Portugal
  25. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Travel. Garden. Eat.
  26. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | piran café
  27. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | The Patient Gardener’s Weblog
  28. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « britten
  29. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Wind Against Current
  30. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | IsobelandCat’s Blog
  31. Changing Seasons « the thirdeyeworld
  32. Awake In A Dream « Eclipse
  33. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons – Sunrise over the Bay | Hippie Cahier
  34. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « What’s (in) the picture?
  35. WordPress Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons (and December Day 7!) « A year in the Life
  36. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « From My Horizon
  37. Orange (Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Season) « Little Yaris Photo
  38. Weekly Photo Challenge: CHANGING SEASONS « The Adventures of Iñigo Boy
  39. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Blatherskite
  40. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons With a Twist | Ron Mayhew Photography
  41. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Hurtled to 60 and Now Beyond…
  42. Let it snow, let it snow, let it snow… | Thirdeyemom
  43. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « Sasieology
  44. weekly photo challenge: Changing Seasons « A Meditative Journey with Saldage
  45. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons « Afghan Videos and Music
  46. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing seasons « Julie Dawn Fox Photography
  47. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | Four Deer Oak
  48. Weekly Photo Challenge: Changing Seasons | my life afterglow