Broken down barracks of Fort Ord in the Monterey Bay

Starting in 1917 and up to the 1990’s, almost 1,500,000 military troops trained at Fort Ord.  It was a major army post, located here in the Monterey Bay, in California’s central coast.

Although the post closed in 1994, many of the old buildings remain.

Because I was in the military, there is a part of me that is nostalgic about these buildings…and having lived at military bases, they are familiar to me.Fort Ord off Imjin Eucalyptus side barracks

In addition to its role as a major training base for the army, Fort Ord was also a staging and deployment area for troops that fought in World War II, as well as the Vietnam war.

Word War II is known as the most violent and largest armed conflict in history, and troops who trained here were involved in battles in the Philippines — my home country — after the Japanese conquered the Philippines in 1942.

Many of the old buildings at Fort Ord have already been torn down, and eventually, these will too, to be replaced with new housing communities, office and service facilities, and new shopping centers.

Fort Ord off Imjin barracks 6a

I’ve wanted to photograph some of these old buildings before they are gone forever, and glad that I finally had a chance to do so this month.

I was in the Air Force, and our living quarters were called “dormitories”.  But in the army and other armed forces, buildings that house soldiers are called “barracks”.  Definition below:

The English word comes via French from an old Catalan word “barraca” (hut), originally referring to temporary shelters or huts for various people and animals, but today barracks, are usually permanent buildings for military accommodation.

…The main object of barracks is to separate soldiers from the civilian population and reinforce discipline, training, and esprit de corps.

Fort Ord off Imjin barracks 2

These barracks photos are much different from my previous post for The Changing Season photo challenge (the beautiful scenery at Monterey’s Fisherman’s Wharf).

Fort Ord off Imjin exit side table

Still…I think it is worth posting, and preserving these images, especially as the landscape transitions to something else.

I imagined this place once filled with many soldiers, and the bugle sounds of the morning reveille — the wake up call (short sound clip below).

Over 20 years after the post closure, the abandoned barracks stand, wounded by vandals, and awaiting their end.

Most of the buildings have broken windows…

Doors removed, stairs missing or overtaken by iceplants…

Fort Ord off Imjin no more stairs

Debris around some of the buildings…

What remains at the Imjin exit side of Fort Ord are mature eucalyptus trees, and the ever-present and invasive ice plants — planted there to contain the sand and for erosion control.

Fort Ord off Imjin Eucalyptus trees

Across the street from these barracks, a wellness center and a shopping center is in place, and beyond these new buildings are brand new housing communities.

Future of Fort Ord land 1

The Ford Ord land also houses facilities used by California State University Monterey Bay (CSUMB).  With plenty of land available to construct new buildings, CSUMB is predicted to eventually be the largest in the California State University system.

Fort Ord off Imjin Exit

It’s not all going to be developed though…

Thankfully, three years ago, a large part of the Fort Ord area became a national monument, and is federally protected from further development — a great thing for the Monterey Bay area!

In addition to the interior part of the Fort Ord land, beaches in this area are also part of the national monument  / California State Park system, and land set aside for the public.

And so the Fort Ord land that started as an artillery training field almost 100 years ago, and was a major post for the military from World War I to 1994 now continues its transition, with much of the land going back to public use.

Are there military base closures where you live?  How has the government and community transformed the land after closing the military facility?

Related link: President Barack Obama Proclamation – Establishment of the Fort Ord National Monument

…The protection of the Fort Ord area will maintain its historical and cultural significance, attract tourists and recreationalists from near and far, and enhance its unique natural resources, for the enjoyment of all Americans.

On to Monterey’s Fishermans Wharf for this month’s Changing Season WordPress Photo Challenge

During March, I photographed buildings and gardens in the old downtown, historic part of Monterey, California.  For the April “Changing Seasons” WordPress Photo Challenge, I continued my walk from the Customs House Plaza to Fisherman’s Wharf, a popular tourist destination in Monterey.

I initially avoided going to the Fisherman’s Wharf area because it is geared to tourist, filled with stores that sell kitschy seaside type items, but it is a fun area with good restaurants and views that yield scenic photos.  The coastal trail is usually a blur of people out for walks with their pets or with families pushing strollers, and bicycle riders cruising the Pacific Trail, especially during summertime.

The colors of the buildings combined with springtime blooms created bright photographs…

My favorite among these is the bright yellows and purple blooms in front of this pink building at the wharf’s entrance.

Monterey Fishermans Wharf yellows and pink

Tourist were out and about and watching wildlife and California sea lions…(sadly, many sea lions have been found stranded at California beaches this year, which scientists suspect is due to warming ocean temperatures and their difficulties in finding food — see my post here last month, for more information).

Back to downtown old Monterey, pollarded trees that were bare and dormant last month have sprouted springtime leaves…

Spring leaves on pollarded trees

Spring leaves on trees by barn 1And wisteria vines that were spilling with beautiful purple flowers last month are now covered with fresh spring leaves…

Old Monterey entrance Whaling Station Building 1

I photographed other interesting buildings in old downtown as well…buildings with the flags — there are several of them in old downtown — house the Middlebury Institute of International Studies at Monterey.

And a mark of the season, more flowers in bloom and delivery of Easter Lily plants, in preparation for Easter Sunday last week…

To see entries for this challenge hosted by Cardinal Guzman, or to participate, click here.

Happy Spring to all…or whatever season it may be in your part of the world!

Memory Garden Wisteria

Click on the photo of the Wisteria vine and fountains at left, taken at the Pacific House Garden, to view last month’s entry.

 

 

IMG00586Related post:

February Entry: The Longevity of author John Steinbeck – photos from his hometown

March Entry – Historic Monterey

Post From Hunting Whales to Celebrating Whales in Monterey Bay

Historic Monterey – Photos for the Monthly Photo Challenge “The Changing Seasons”

I’m participating in a monthly photo challenge called “The Changing Seasons” to practice my photography.  My first entry were photos from author John Steinbeck’s hometown, of Oldtown Salinas.

This month, I’m focusing on the historic buildings and gardens in the “old” downtown area of Monterey, as I can see a more distinct change in seasons with the lovely (and secret) gardens in old Monterey.  These photographs were taken earlier this week.

Memory Garden Wisteria

Monterey is the most well-known city in Monterey County, here in the Central Coast of California.  Right now, there are not many tourist, but in another month or two, there will be a lot of visitors converging in this area.

Many people have heard of Monterey, perhaps because of the annual Monterey Jazz Festival, or the world-renowned Monterey Aquarium, and tourist destinations like Cannery Row (immortalized in John Steinbeck novels), and Fisherman’s Wharf.  The spectacular “Big Sur” coast, the Pebble Beach and Spanish Bay Golf Courses are also huge tourist draws for the county.

The Cannery Row area is in a newer part of town, called “New Monterey” and where most tourist visit, and because it leads to the Monterey Bay Aquarium.

Old Monterey Buildings Details 6Less visited is the older, downtown part of Monterey, which is actually very interesting with many historic buildings, all within easy walking distance of one another.Bouganvilleas

There are homes in the area that are National and California Historical Landmarks, and buildings that combine Spanish Colonial building methods with New England architectural features.

There are also Monterey Colonial style of architecture, which features two stories, porches, a hip roof, and adobe walls.  Some of the buildings are occupied as offices by the city (including one by the City Attorney).

Here are a few examples of the buildings and homes in the area…

Building details…

There are espaliered and pollarded trees in the city gardens and streets, which I photographed so I can see them with leaves and in bloom for the next visit…

Espalier example Historic Monterey Gardens 1

 

And finally, my favorite part, the gardens, with many plants in bloom, a feast for the eyes…

 

Eventually, I will learn more technical aspects of photography…for now though, I am just pointing and shooting, and enjoying the process.  It is also fun to play tourist in one’s “backyard” through this photo challenge.

To see entries for this challenge hosted by Cardinal Guzman, or to participate, click here.

WPC Reward: The longevity of author John Steinbeck – photos from his hometown

Yesterday. February 27, was the author John Steinbeck’s birthday (February 27, 1902 – December 20, 1968) — a good occasion to post my Oldtown Salinas photos and submit my 2nd WordPress Photo Challenge on the theme of Reward, for the reward of longevity.

Longevity: long life – the fact of living for many years – length of life – the length of time that something or someone lasts or continues (Definition from the Merriam-Webster dictionary)

Story of the whole valley web

Steinbeck’s words carved into stone at entrance of National Steinbeck Center

Among the rewards for a life well-lived is physical longevity and what is left, well after death.

John Steinbeck was born in Salinas, Monterey County, California.  He wrote 27 books and won both a Pulitzer and the National Book Award for his novel, The Grapes of Wrath.  He also won the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1962 (controversial at the time) for “the most outstanding work in an ideal direction”  and “realistic and imaginative writing, combining as it does sympathetic humor and keen social perception”.

Salinas is the largest city in Monterey County, and the county seat.  It has a population of 155,000 and is located 8 miles from the Pacific Ocean.

The mild weather and rich valley soil is why the area is called “the salad bowl of the world”.  It is the only county in the United States that produces more than $1 billion annually in vegetable sales.

Salinas Valley Fields web

This was taken last week…really! The weather is so mild here, that there is something growing in the fields most of the time.

 

Much of Steinbeck’s writing is set in Southern and Central California, particularly the Salinas Valley and the Central California Coast.

The photos below are from “Old Town” Salinas, location of the National Steinbeck Center.  The house where John Steinbeck was born is a few blocks away from Oldtown. 

Steinbeck Center

Buildings in the Victorian style of architecture dot the old town Salinas downtown area.

Here are some examples of the buildings, walking out from the National Steinbeck Center…

Old Salinas buildings 5 web

Some of the building details in Oldtown…

And some interesting tile work on a few of the entryways…

And finally, some scenes from  the stores and restaurants in Oldtown…

Steinbeck Statue at Salinas Library web

 

The old town Salinas library is a few blocks away and is named after John Steinbeck.

There is another of the rock (like the one in front of the Steinbeck Center) carved with his quote, outside the library…

 

Books Best Friend Quote web

In addition to tips learned on the WordPress Photo Challenges, these series of photos were also inspired by Cardinal Guzman’s new photo challenge The Changing Seasons “to train your eye”.

This is my first attempt at taking a series of photos of one place, and it certainly made me look up/down and check out details, which I think in general makes me a better observer of what is around me…of life.

I’m inspired by photography that captures a sense of place and people, especially vibrant photos from The Third Eye Mom (see Lesson in Street Photography), and intricate nature photos, and great landscape photography from Just Another Nature Enthusiast (see the EcoRegion series).

In our digital era and through our blogs, we all have the opportunity for the “reward” of longevity — since our words and photos will be around long after we are gone, right?

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To see interpretations from the WordPress blogging community or to join in the Weekly Photo Challenge, click here.

To participate in the new monthly photo challenge, The Changing Seasons, hosted by Cardinal Guzman, click here.  NOTE: I’m also including these photos as my first attempt and as practice 🙂 for this monthly challenge (though late, and more photos than suggested) since I like the idea of capturing sets of photos for different seasons — plus these photos are not archived, or published elsewhere, but taken last week. 

Seeing amazing photos from the WordPress blogging community is always inspiring, and tips are always appreciated from seasoned and professional photographers.