WPC Orange 2: California’s First Brick House

Californias 1st brick building Monterey State Historic ParkCalifornia’s first “fired brick” house —  part of the Monterey State Historic Park’s buildings in downtown old Monterey — also fits right in the WordPress Photo Challenge theme of orange.

The house was built in 1847.  Before construction of this brick structure, most homes in the area were made from adobe — blocks of sun-dried mud.

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From the HistoricMonterey.org website:

All Monterey’s early structures were built of adobe (sun-dried mud) blocks. Walls as thick as three feet were needed to support second story floors.

Adobe buildings required plastering on exterior surfaces to keep out damaging winter rains, otherwise the walls were likely to crumble.

 In 1847, Gallant Dickerson arrived in Monterey to introduce a new building technique to California: the art of fired clay brickmaking. Fired brick’s increased strength allowed multiple-storied buildings with standard wall widths; fired brick was also water-resistant and required little or no surface treatment.

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Dickerson fired thousands of clay blocks into rock-hard bricks, and with them built one of the first fired-brick buildings in California. He completed only the portion of First Brick House that stands today before moving his family to the Sierra Nevadas in search of gold.

To see other entries and interpretations on the photo theme orange, click here.

Weekly WordPress Challenge: Resolved — to capture the details

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge from Sara Rosso:

Resolved. This is that time of year, isn’t it? Full of resolutions and good intentions… …Why not share a photo which represents one of your New Year’s resolutions? If you don’t make them, what about sharing a photo which represents something you’d like to get better at in photography this year?  Share a picture which means RESOLVED to you!

My first post for 2013 and what I resolve to do to get better at photography this year is to capture more details.

I love taking photographs and have photographed landscapes and people — mostly my family members, whether they liked it or not — since I had my first 110 Instamatic Kodak camera as a young teen.

These days, with our smart phones, we all always have a camera no matter where we go — capturing the world around us. The photos below were from my HTC phone camera the week of Christmas, during a visit to gardens of the adobe-and-wood Larkin House, built in 1835 in Monterey, California.

I liked the design of the iron water well cover…

This normally would have been enough detail, but this time, I came in closer.

The close up shot resulted in seeing an interesting reflection of the well cover design from the water below.

To get an idea of the well size, here is a photo of my sister and brother-in-law sitting at the edge of the well.  In the past, this would have been my only photo of the well…so, a big improvement so far!

Details, and a lot more up close photographs are my goals for my 2013 photographs!

Larkin House Fence

 

photo from www.HistoricMonterey.org

The Larkin House was built byThomas Oliver Larkin — the only U.S. consul to California under Mexican rule.  The home became the American consulate from 1844 to 1846, and  also used as military headquarters by Kearny, Mason, and Sherman.

Both a National and a California Historical Landmark, the Larkin House is reportedly the first two story house in all of California, and combined Spanish Colonial building methods with New England architectural features.  It also originated the popular Monterey Colonial style of architecture, which features two stories, porches, a hip roof, and adobe walls.

For more information on the Larkin House, visit HistoricMonterey.org or the California Department of Parks and Recreation’s Larkin House webpage here.