Wal-Mart targets Asian-American shoppers with culture-specific Black Friday ads – Tagalish, lip-point and all

Since English is an official language in the Philippines, U.S. based companies that use Tagalog (the national language of the Philippines) orTagalish to target Filipino American consumers always piqué my interest.

I started to collect MacDonald’s ads that use Tagalish…and now add this Wal-Mart Black Friday ad targeting the Asian-American community.

Here is one in “Tagalog” — at least according to the ad title — though really, it is in Tagalish.  Talk about really targeting Filipino-Americans…an actor points his lips in the 31 second ad.

See the other ads in “Hinglish” and Mandarin on Joey DeVilla’s website. The script format is the same in all the ads, including a lola / grandmother in each version.

By the way,  are YOU shopping on the Thanksgiving day holiday? Wal-Mart, Target, Sears, Kohl’s and Best Buy are among the stores open on Thanksgiving Day, while Costco, Home Deport, Pier One and Crate & Barrel are among the stores who refuse to open on Thanksgiving Day.

Related LolaKo.com posts and further information:

Want to learn English — and on a budget?

How about studying English in the Philippines?  It turns out the Philippines is a great destination for students who want to learn how to speak English, and on a budget.

Skyline of the City of Manila, Philippines, seen from the Cultural Center of the Philippines, photo by Mike Gonzalez via Wikipedia

I have met several Koreans (from my grandsons’ Tae Kwon Do classes) who indeed took English classes in the Philippines.  While visiting Cebu, I was also surprised to see all the Korean restaurants and Korean signs, catering to the new population of English-learning students from Korea.

Photo from the Philippine Department of Tourism

Here is the excerpt from a BBC Philippines report from Kate McGeown:

The Philippines is fast becoming the world’s low-cost English language teacher – with rapid increases in overseas students coming to learn English or study in English-speaking universities.

There might be other countries that people think about as a classic place to learn English, such as the UK, the US or Australia.

But there is one key reason that they are switching to the Philippines. It’s much cheaper. And in the competitive market for language students, it means the Philippines is attracting people from countries such as Iran, Libya, Brazil and Russia.

“We have very competitive rates compared with other countries,” says English teacher, Jesy King, citing her school’s fees of $500 (£313) for a 60-hour class – about a third of the price of an equivalent course in the US or Canada.

Another major advantage is the accent.

Filipinos speak with a clear American accent – partly because the Philippines was a US colony for five decades, and partly because so many people here have spent time working in call centres that cater to a US market….

She adds…

The Philippines markets itself as being the third largest English-speaking nation – after the US and the UK – a fact proudly displayed on the Department of Tourism website. And in a way, that’s true. Most people speak at least rudimentary English, and the well-educated speak it fluently.

Yes indeed…here is that section from www.ExperiencePhilippines.org website:

Considered the third-largest English-speaking country in the world, the Philippines offers world-class facilities and services – excellent accommodations, fine restaurants, modern shopping centers and communication services, efficient congress and exhibition organizers and professional tour operators.

Photo from Philippine Department of Tourism

Click here to read Kate McGeown’s article, The Philippines: The world’s budget English teacher and video.

Common modes of transportation in more rural areas in the Philippines.

Tagalish SPICY McBites

I still don’t get why McDonald’s has these Tagalog / English — or “Tagalish” — ads in U.S. published, Philippine newspapers…well, aside from keeping those fast food dollars going to McDonalds, instead of Philippine fast food giant, Jollibee.

English, along with Tagalog is an official language in government, and most newspapers in the Philippines are published in ENGLISH.

It must be working for them.  Here is another one…this time, spicy chicken McBites.

Tagalish Spicy McBite Ad

Ad reads:

A different new taste in the flavor world.  New Spicy Chicken McBites from McDonalds — each bite of chicken brings unparalleled spicy taste.  Taste it soon as it is available only for a limited time.

View the rest of the Tagalish ads in Lolako’s category “Language and Advertising – Tagalish Ads”

I, too, speak, and write in Tagalish.  I do wonder though, as a Filipino-American, do these “Tagalish” ads make you feel like McDonald’s cares about your culture, or, knowing that the Philippines is the 3rd largest, English-speaking country in the world, do you feel insulted?

Tagalish Chicken McBites

And also, another multi-culture, “Tagalish” ad, with this new one from McDonald’s.

Except for the second sentence, the text is both in English and Tagalog for this ad.

Details read: Flavor so big, you will be surprised….Each bite provides delicious flavor…Taste the new Chicken McBites from McDonald’s before it’s gone.

Click here to view more Tagalish ads, in LolaKo’s Language & Advertising category.

Tagalish McRib

I’m adding this McRib ad to my now, sort of blog collection of Tagalish – Tagalog and English advertising.  So far, most of what I see are from McDonald’s — and this by far is the silliest. It is also different from the ones I’ve posted in that the sentences are either in English or Tagalog, but the ad itself uses both languages.

What does this ad convey, and what does “winning or losing” have to do with a sandwich anyway?

Oh I see…it translates:

Nandito na ulit ang McRib (The McRib is here again)

Sobrang sarap ng sandwich, ipaglalaban ko ito (The sandwich is so good, I’ll fight for it).

Okay then….

Click here to see the rest of the Tagalish ads, in my new category pages.

What do you think of this one?

The Jolly Bee & McDonalds Targeted Ads: Part 3

So I wondered… why are there McDonalds Tagalog / English ads in Philippine newspapers, here in the U.S.?  After all, Filipinos living here in America speak English (as do Filipinos living in the Philippines!)

I think I know why now—- and it’s about Jollibee.

Photo from www.Jollibeeusa.com

I recently read about Jollibee’s plans to set up 280 new stores this year, with 90 in China, as part of a major expansion.

Philippine-based Jollibee Food Corporation (JFC) started in Manila, soon after McDonalds made plans to enter the Philippine market.

At that time, the company founders—who had just started a Magnolia ice cream parlor franchise that also served sandwiches — figured that catering to the taste buds of Filipinos, and making spicier hamburgers would be the way to have an advantage over McDonalds.

Jollibee is now the Philippines’ largest chain restaurant, with over 600 locations (now 800 locations, as I update this post in March, 2014).  There are currently 26 locations in the U.S (mostly in California), and outlets in Saudi Arabia, Vietnam, Brunei and Hong Kong.  It is one of Southeast Asia’s most successful companies.

Should McDonalds —with their 32,000+ locations worldwide— be concerned?  Well, perhaps enough so…at least for their Filipino-American customers, that they are doing these language specific ad campaigns in California..

The US State Department estimates the number of Filipinos in the U.S. at 4 million, or about 1.5% of the population  (as a comparison, the combined population of the states Wyoming, Vermont, Alaska, Montana, Hawaii and Rhode Island is a little over 4 million).

Filipino-Americans are among the most educated, and have the highest incomes compared to other Asian-American groups (and so have money to spend on fast food restaurants, among other things).

Jollibee restaurants are opening up in areas of the US with a large and established population of Filipinos. Though this data is from 2000, areas highlighted with a high number of Filipino-Americans remain the same. New Jollibee restaurants are planned for New Jersey and Virginia.

But the U.S. Filipino market is just a small part of Jollibee’s expansion plans, when you look at the 90 stores they plan for China.

Jollibee has already established a presence in China by taking over several Chinese restaurant chains, including a fast food noodle chain last year.   And with China now an economic power, it may be easier to grow and catch up with McDonalds in China than here in the U.S.

McDonalds Targeted Advertising Part 2

And there it was again…McDonalds advertising in a Philippine newspaper using English and Tagalog  (Tagalish?) words.   No burgers this time — which was on my original post on this topic  (click here to read).

Well…it must be working since there were now two half page McDonald ads in the main section of this particular Filipino newspaper.

One ad is for an Asian salad: “Tikman ang harmony ng nature sa bawat bowl” (Taste the harmony of nature in each bowl)

McDonalds Tagalog and English Ad for Asian Salad

 

And the other for McNuggets.

 

McDonalds Tagalog and English Advertising - Chicken Nuggets

And so again, I am curious how the ad folks choose which words to use in English and which in Tagalog?  Do you think it is how the sentence sounds mixed up…or is it just more challenging to translate some words from Tagalog to English?

Here are the text details —

As far as translation for the McNuggets Ad at least…Filipinos do like their dipping sauces with certain foods (sawsawan) so it is not like there is not an equivalent word in Tagalog.

Strangely, I did like reading the following mixed words:

  • Ito ang big picture (here is the big picture)…and
  • Everybody say, “Saaaaarap” (Everybody say “Deeeeelicious”).

Though at the same time, I still wonder — and don’t know what to make of this mash-up of the two languages.  Is it to make Filipinos feel, well……included?  Attention Filipinos in America: McDonalds can speak (some of) your language!  And wants your fast-food dollars.

Well maybe the ad is working on me, or I am just getting hungry.    Or I like big pictures.  Or I really just like saying “Saaaaaarap!”

What do you think of these Tagalog and English ads?

McDonald’s Advertising in Tagalish (Tagalog + English)

I picked up a Philippine Newspaper (U.S. published) and saw this full-page ad from McDonald’s.   The ad features a hamburger, then 4 lines of text containing Filipino (Tagalog) and English words….Tagalish?

It is safe to say that almost all Filipinos speak English.  It is taught in school and is part of the language spoken in government, the media, the arts, etc.

Having been a colony of the United States after the Spanish-American War, American English is permanently embedded in the culture and language.

What is interesting to me in this ad is combining the two languages…is this done in other markets?

I understand ads in a specific language to target the demographic, but a combination in English?

When you see an ad for McDonalds, say in Spanish, do they just use Spanish text, or a sort of Spanglish like in this ad?

Perhaps this is how the Filipino language is now morphing or  spoken in the U.S.— this sort of Tagalish, or how the next generation is speaking Tagalog.

Is the ad saying LOOK, WE SPEAK YOUR LANGUAGE (well actually, it is saying, we speak some of it and sort of).   After all, they do spend loads of money researching this stuff prior to doing ad campaigns right?

Here is the rest of the ad.  Curious on how they decided which words to use in English (buns, pure beef patties, everlasting joy).  Let me know what you think…

(Click here for a new post on this topic)