WPC: Depth — King Tides and flooded paths at Elkhorn Slough

Last Wednesday, we had super high tides in our area.  These high tides are also called “king tides”, and can damage property as well as cause erosion in coastal areas.

I went to Elkhorn Slough the day of the high tide to take photographs.

Elkhorn Slough Viewing Area web

Outside of San Francisco Bay, Elkhorn Slough harbors California’s largest tract of tidal salt marsh.

It is home to more than 135 aquatic bird, 550 marine invertebrate, 102 fish species, sea lions, harbor seals, and California sea otters.  It is also a temporary home to hundreds of bird species that use the slough during their annual migrations.

It is a treasure in this area of California, and a special place to see wildlife up close — and a safe place to kayak (weather permitting of course!)

Elkhorn Slough web

Here is a little about the area from the Elkhorn Slough.org website:

Dunes and broad stretches of open sandy beach characterize the inner curve of Monterey Bay.

The expansive beaches are interrupted only by the outlets of the Pajaro and Salinas Rivers, and the entrance to Elkhorn Slough and Moss Landing Harbor.

The protected waters of the slough and its associated mudflats, wetlands, and nearby dunes provide a haven for a wide variety of birds, fish and unusual marine life.

This remarkable variety of habitats provides visitors a rare opportunity to explore and discover nature’s secrets.

Elkhorn water web

The tide for the area is normally around 5 feet.  During the king tide, the tide rose to over 6 feet and flooded walking paths, as well as the parking area of Kirby Park, one of the launching points for those who want to kayak in the slough.

For a comparison, here is a photo of my grandchildren walking the path at Kirby Park, taken on a foggy day in 2009.

Elkhorn path no flooding web

And below are photos I took from my phone camera on January 21, 2015, one of the “king tide” days…

Elkhorn flooded path 1 webThe tide reached its peak while a family was at the viewing bridge, and they had to pass the flooded path to get back to the parking area.

Some waited for the water to recede, including me!  I do like to keep my feet and shoes dry, and was not willing to walk on the logs that lined the path (I’m not good at balancing…and pretty sure I would have ended up with more than wet shoes).

Elkhorn flooded path web

Parts of the path have already eroded…

Elkhorn water eroding path web

And those who parked in the launching area to kayak may have been surprised to see water near their vehicles upon their return.

Kirby flooded parking area web

Parts of parking area near launching ramp flooded…Kirby parking and docking area web

We will see if these tides get more severe, meaning many coastal areas, and even small parks like Kirby will need funding to repair and raise walking paths and parking areas.

Documenting the differences will hopefully help in budgeting and planning for these changes in our environment.

This post is part of the WordPress Weekly Photo Challenge.  The theme this week is Depth, from Ben Huberman:

This week, share with us your take on “depth” — you can take it literally, like me, by showing something (a dense forest, your lawn after a blizzard) that suggests volume, a distance between surface and bottom. Or go with a more figurative approach: use a deep color palette, play with your image’s depth of field, or highlight a person, a place, or an object to which you feel deeply connected.

  • More information: California King Tides Project – Snap the Shore, See the Future  The California King Tides Project help people visualize how sea level rise will impact their lives.  Via smartphones and social media, we invite you to document “king tides” – the highest high tides of today, which will be the average water levels of the future.  The pictures that you take help scientists and managers better plan for future flood risks, and give you a way to participate directly in the science that will drive decisions in your community.  Everyone is welcome to participate!
  • And see more Lolako.com posts related to Elkhorn Slough, here.

Where Democrats and Republicans stand on birth control and moral issues

Birth Control

Photo via the Gallup website

The topic of birth control is controversial in the Philippines, so I was surprised to see this Gallup poll (found as I was working on my post about Pope Francis’ visit to the Philippines) that here in the U.S., most Americans say that birth control is morally OK.

The Gallup’s Values and Beliefs Survey report that “eighty-two percent of U.S. Catholics say birth control is morally acceptable, nearing the 89% of all Americans and 90% of non-Catholics who agree.”

The same article also posted this chart from the survey, on the major differences between Democrats and Republicans in moral acceptability of issues: Gallup Survey Moral AcceptibilityAny surprises, or is this what you expected to see? For details, here is the link to the Gallup survey and article.  Excerpt:

Although Catholic leaders have protested the portion of the Affordable Care Act mandating that health insurance plans include payment for birth control, the average rank-and-file Catholic in the U.S. finds the use of birth control morally acceptable.

Catholic leaders are no doubt aware that many of their parishioners use birth control, but these data underscore the divide between official church teaching and Catholics’ day-by-day behaviors.

Democrats and Republicans have long differed on their positions on these types of moral issues, and these data confirm how far apart partisans continue to be in this important election year. Although values concerns are seldom rated the most important issues in a presidential campaign, a candidate’s positions on such issues can serve to motivate his party’s base, and can help determine vote choice for the small segments of voters for whom values are very important.

WordPress Photo Challenge: Express Yourself…with hats and sunglasses!

One of the fun ways children express themselves is through costumes and dress up times, or sometimes, donning and playing with whatever is around at the time.

This week, the theme from Krista is “Express Yourself”…

Today, we challenge you to show us what “express yourself” means to you. It could be the delightful, gummy grin of a baby grand-nephew, a message of love written with a biplane in the sky, the clenched fist of anger and frustration, or even a lunch with an attitude. This topic is wide-open and I can’t wait to see what you do with it. Have fun!

My goodness…a totally wide-open challenge with a theme like this opens it up to all sorts of interpretation, and is also a good excuse to post photos I cherish!  I hope you enjoy these “hat” and sun glass photos of my grandsons

silly hatsThe same hats…

Jun in curly que hatCurly hat…

G hard hat 1 web

Hard hat (here is Gabriel giving “directions” — he likes being the boss)

JJ 2 hats web

Jun with TWO hats —- because sometimes, one hat is not enough!

G bike helmet and swim  goggles

Bike helmet over hat, finished with swim goggles – his own look!

G TKD Helmet webSquishy face under kick paddle “hat” — at the 2014 USA Taekwondo National Championships where there is a lot of waiting, a bored Gabriel decides to wear the martial arts kicking paddles.

G Indiana Jones hat web

The boys had identical Indiana Jones hats, and for a while they liked to wear it everywhere — on the way to Taekwondo practice.

And then the sunglasses….

2 Sunglasses again

JJ Sunglasses web

2 Sunglasses web

Lastly, anytime I can capture photos of my grandsons around flowers is a happy photograph for me…J and daisies web

G Flowers webTo see interpretations of the theme “Express Yourself” from the WordPress blogging community, click here…and enjoy!

PRI Article: Catholic leaders battle against birth control in the Philippines

Related to my post yesterday about Pope Francis’ visit to the Philippines, and on the pope’s comment that  “Catholics should not be like rabbits”, here is a report from PRI: Catholic leaders battle against free birth control in the Philippines

Video accompanying the article…

Excerpt:

…Half of all pregnancies in the predominantly Catholic Philippines are unintended, according to a recent study by the Guttmacher Institute, a US-based think tank that promotes reproductive health.

Of those unintended pregnancies, 90 percent are due to a lack of modern methods of contraception. Unlike in some other developing nations, the Philippines’ government has not provided free contraception.

…The lack of free contraception has taken a toll on maternal health, according to experts.

The Philippines isn’t on track to meet the UN’s Millennium Development Goal of reducing maternal deaths from 162 per 100,000 in 2006 to just 52 deaths per 100,000 women by this year.

The UN Population Fund’s director for the Philippines, Klaus Beck, is hopeful the new law will change things.

And here is the UN MDG (Millennium Development Goals) Analysis for the Philippines, referenced by this report:

UN MDG Goals Analysis Philippines

UN Millennium Development Goals Analysis for the Philippines. Click on the chart for full details.

Want more information about the UN’s Millennium Development Goals for 2015?  See my post about the promise of 189 nations to free people from extreme poverty here.

What are your thoughts and opinion about this?  I’d like to know…

Why Pope Francis went to the Philippines

Pope Francis’ 4-day visit to the Philippines last week prompted questions from my (not Filipino) friends like…”so why did the pope visit your home country?  Why not other, more populous nations in the region — like Indonesia, or Pakistan or Bangladesh?”

Photo from the Vatican website

Photo from the Vatican website

My friends are right in that the Philippines is not the most populous country in Asia and even in Southeast Asia.  What they didn’t know was that the Philippines is the only country in the region with a majority Christian (primarily Catholic) religion.

Media reported that 80% of the Philippine population are Catholics.  Since the Philippines is the 12th most populous country in the world with over 100 million people, that is around 80 million Filipino Catholics!

The Philippines is among the 10 countries in the world with the largest number of Christians (ranked #5 after the USA, Brazil, Mexico and Russia).

Here are numbers from a Pew Research study:

Chart Source: PewResearch Religion and Public Life Project

Chart Source: Pew Research Religion and Public Life Project

Around 6 million people gathered to see and hear Pope Francis at Manila’s Luneta / Rizal Park last week.  Rizal Park (renamed after Philippine national hero Jose Rizal) is one of the largest urban park in Asia — but still, a crowd of 6 million?

Six million is roughly the entire population of Finland, or the entire U.S. state of Massachusetts converging for an event in one place.  Can you imagine being around that many faithful followers?

Many Filipinos are religious — and it is no wonder there are 80 million Catholics in the Philippines. For many, this faith sustains the spirit, and gives hope, despite living in conditions that most of us cannot imagine.

But the Catholic church — at least in the Philippines — is so powerful that over the last 15 years, they blocked and stood in the way of badly needed reproductive rights legislation.  Legislation that would have allowed family planning education and for poor families to access free birth control to help with overpopulation, and subsequent poverty problems.

See my post

Population Philippines – Too many mouths to feed

and the beautiful and poignant video “Above and Below” from Stephen Werc on the post “Living with the dead” to get an idea.

A reproductive health bill finally passed and is now law, but the church is continuing to lobby to overturn the new law.

The Pope visited the Philippines because there are more Catholics there than any other nation in Asia.  Prior to going to Manila, the Pope also visited Tacloban, the area hit by Super Typhoon, Haiyan in November of 2013. Typhoon Haiyan was the most devastating typhoon in Philippine history and one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever recorded.

I am not a Catholic — and don’t agree with their stance on birth control — but if I was, Pope Francis is someone I imagine I could relate to, as the leader of my church.

Family planning aside, Pope Francis seems like someone who truly cares about the plight of poor people on our planet.  I just don’t understand  why the Catholic church view family planning and reproductive health topics as separate from what contributes to world poverty.

You may have heard about the latest OXFAM report published this month, and that “1 in 9 people do not have enough to eat and more than a billion people still live on less than $1.25-a-day.

We cannot accept this, and I hope the power of faith, and those devoted to the core beliefs of Christianity or whatever religion guides them, will work to eradicate poverty and to address the unbelievable, and continuing inequality of what the rich have and what the poor do not, living in our modern, but fragile world.

—————————————————————————

Notes:

  • The last time the leader of the Catholic church visited the Philippines was 20 years ago, when Pope St. John Paul II presided over World Youth Day in Manila.
  • Prior to arriving in the Philippines, Pope Francis was in the country of Sri Lanka to canonize the country’s first saint, Blessed Joseph Vaz who was known as the “Apostle of Ceylon.”  Sri Lanka has a population of 20 million, of which 7.4 % are Christians, with about 80% of Christians being Roman Catholic. Portuguese colonist brought Christianity to Sri Lanka in the early 16th century (more about Sri Lanka here).

Related:

OXFAM International’s article - Richest 1% will own more than all the rest in 2016

For more on countries the pope will visit this year (including scheduled visits tot he USA and Africa), visit the National Catholic Register website here.

You may find the following LolaKo.com post of interest as well, related to  the Philippines & human development topics:

WordPress Photo Challenge: Serenity – Surfer at Sunset

Sunsets for me evoke serenity…and lately, the sunsets here on the Central Coast of California have been spectacular.

California surfer at sunset web

Surfer at sunset at Fort Ord Dunes State Park (California). Photo via my HTC One phone camera.

At the recently opened Fort Ord Dunes State Park, my sunset image became more interesting with the added silhouette of a surfer who was in the same area to watch the sunset after surfing.

I met him after I took the photo, and it turns out he is a photographer and takes photographs of waves while surfing — how cool is that!

Surfer-in-training-3Related post:

One of the first photo challenges I participated in…(a “blogging experiment”) when the theme was the color blue.

My little surfers in training (in Pacifica, near San Francisco, CA)…(click on photo to see the series posted for the challenge)

See more interpretations of Serenity from the WordPress Photo Challenge blogging community here.

WordPress Photo Challenge – resting dragonfly shadow

I enjoy WordPress photo challenges and continue to pick up great tips — in addition to seeing stunning photographs by fellow bloggers — through these challenges.

The theme for the second challenge in 2015 is Shadowed, from Jen Hooks…

For this week’s Photo Challenge, find the shadows. You can choose a literal interpretation and shoot an actual shadow, or you can play with the light and dark, and create a moody scene, or capture your subject in a rich and interesting way.

Dragonfly Shadow web

I have yet to experiment with shadows and low lighting, so I am submitting my shot of a dragonfly and its shadow, resting on a Native Leaf wine bag (which I posted on the NL blog).  Excerpt:

Dragonflies are ancient insects and there are 28 species of dragonflies and damselflies in the San Francisco Bay area.

Looking at the Wildlife of the San Francisco Bay Area website, it looks like this particular one is a Blue-eyed Darner – Rhionaeschna multicolor.

I remember chasing after vibrantly colored dragonflies when I was a kid growing up in the Philippines.  There was a house near us with an abandoned pool and what must have been perfect breeding grounds for them, as dragonflies and damselflies begin their lives living underwater for a year of more as nymphs (eating lots of mosquito).  No wonder there were so many dragonflies in that area!

Of course back then, we did not worry that one of our playmates might fall in the algae, leaf-filled tannin brown (and rather deep) water…we just had fun and ran after the shiny dragonflies.

Why save a dragonfly

Information from the US Fish & Wildlife website Endangered Species Fact Sheet

Did you grow up seeing dragonflies and where there myths about dragonflies in your culture?

Do you still see them where you now live?

Santa’s new ride

Maybe Rudolf and the rest of the flying reindeer needed a break, or it was a quick trip and Santa wanted to try out his other environment friendly ride…

Santa on a Segway web

Whatever the reason, this put a smile on my face, and Santa certainly delighted shoppers at the Old Town Monterey Farmer’s Market last night while riding around on his festively lit Segway.

Santas New Ride

Merry Christmas, Happy Holidays, and all the best for the New Year!

WP Photo Challenge: Angular – a driftwood shelter

This week’s WordPress Photo Challenge “Angular” is from Xiao Yu:

What does angular mean to you? It might mean the corner on which you live or the intersection of sea and sky at a 180 degree angle. Angular also offers a chance to shoot from an entirely new perspective: from above, below, or even from the margins of the fray. Above all, have fun!

I heard my grandsons urging me to go faster…”Come on Lola!” as they ran towards a driftwood shelter they spotted ahead on the beach.  They couldn’t wait to get to it.

web Driftlog shelter 4

Photos of a driftwood shelter did not seem an obvious choice for this challenge, but I imagine whoever built this had to think a lot about angles to construct this beach refuge.

web Driftlog shelter 2

web Driftlog shelter 5

web Driftlog shelter 6

And it was fun to see my grandsons play, and to take photos of the structure from different angles…web Driftlog shelterWho knows from where and how far these logs floated before they landed on this central California beach.  From a recent storm, or a shipwreck from long ago, timber discarded at a faraway beach?

How long did these float among waves, sharp edges and contours softened by the water before landing here to be formed into this shelter…and how long before these wash back into the sea again, perhaps providing shelter for birds and ocean creatures as they float towards the next destination.

See more submissions for this WordPress blog photo challenge here.

Wal-Mart targets Asian-American shoppers with culture-specific Black Friday ads – Tagalish, lip-point and all

Since English is an official language in the Philippines, U.S. based companies that use Tagalog (the national language of the Philippines) orTagalish to target Filipino American consumers always piqué my interest.

I started to collect MacDonald’s ads that use Tagalish…and now add this Wal-Mart Black Friday ad targeting the Asian-American community.

Here is one in “Tagalog” — at least according to the ad title — though really, it is in Tagalish.  Talk about really targeting Filipino-Americans…an actor points his lips in the 31 second ad.

See the other ads in “Hinglish” and Mandarin on Joey DeVilla’s website. The script format is the same in all the ads, including a lola / grandmother in each version.

By the way,  are YOU shopping on the Thanksgiving day holiday? Wal-Mart, Target, Sears, Kohl’s and Best Buy are among the stores open on Thanksgiving Day, while Costco, Home Deport, Pier One and Crate & Barrel are among the stores who refuse to open on Thanksgiving Day.

Related LolaKo.com posts and further information:

The difference between the Veterans Day and Memorial Day holiday… and Filipinos in the U.S. Military

Today is a federal holiday in the U.S. to observe Veterans Day.  Though many federal holidays are observed on Mondays (no matter the actual day it falls in), Veterans Day is always observed on the 11th of November.

Veterans Day Poster web

And if you wondered what the difference is between Memorial Day (observed on the last Monday in May) and Veterans Day….

  • Memorial Day remembers and honors military personnel who died in the service of their country, in particular those who died in battle or resulting from wounds in battle.
  • Veterans Day is a day to thank and honor all who served honorably in the military, in peacetime or during times of war, and intended to thank and appreciate LIVING veterans for their service.
USAF-Crp1

Yes, Lola Jane, USAF 1980 boot camp photo

So from this U.S. Air Force veteran to fellow veterans…thank you for your service, and Happy Veterans Day!

Today, please take time to acknowledge your family and friends who served in the armed forces…and thank them for their service and contributions.

Did you know…thousands of Filipinos and Filipino Americans have served and are currently in the U.S. military?

Americans are sometimes surprised to learn that citizens from other countries serve in the U.S. military, as one may naturally assume that U.S. military people are required to be U.S. citizens.

Filipinos started to serve in the US Navy in great numbers after 1901, when President William McKinley signed an executive order allowing the Navy to enlist 500 Filipinos as part of is insular force (though there are recorded accounts from then General Andrew Jackson of “Manilamen” fighting for the U.S. during the War of 1812).

Filipinos have a long history of serving in the U.S. Armed Forces. In 2012, there were 65,000 immigrants serving in the US armed forces — and nearly 1/4 of the immigrants were from the Philippines!

Further reading from the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs

  • About the Memorial Day Holiday
  • About Veterans Day — especially if you are Interested in learning why the holiday is always observed on November 11th
Propaganda_poster_depicts_the_Philippine_resistance_movement

To learn more about the Military history of Asian Americans, click on the poster image

Further reading from the U.S. Navy Department Library:

  • Naval History and Heritage: Filipinos in the United States Navy (bulletins up to the year 1976).  Note:  When I was in the military, I had a close group of fellow Filipino airmen at the Air Force Base where I was stationed.  I knew back then that there were many more Filipinos in the U.S. Navy — compared to the Air Force and other armed forces — and I wondered why.  Information from the Navy Library answers the questions about why so many Filipinos served in the US Navy (well, up to the year 1976, at least). 

And for more about the history of Asians serving on behalf of the United States, see a comprehensive Wikipedia article here or click on the World War II “The Fighting Filipinos” propaganda poster.

Celebrating Filipino-American History Month in Monterey County: The Asian Cultural Experience Pop-Up Museum

1920s photo via FANHS website

1920’s photo via FANHS website

The first record of Filipinos in the continental US was during the month of October in 1587.

In November, 2009,  the United States House of Representatives and Senate passed laws officially recognizing October as Filipino American History Month in the US.

From the FANHS – Filipino American National Historical Society website…

October’s significance as Filipino American History Month is due to the first recorded presence of Filipinos in the continental United States when on October 18, 1587, “Luzones Indios” came ashore from the Spanish galleon Nuestra Senora de Esparanza and landed at what is now Morro Bay, California.

In November of 2009, both the United States House of Representatives and Senate passed laws – House Resolution 780 and Senate Resolution 298 respectively, officially recognizing October as Filipino American History Month in the United States.

Various states, counties and cities in the U.S. have since followed suit and have established proclamations and resolutions declaring observance of Filipino American History Month in their regions. Continue reading…

If you live in the Monterey Bay area, check out the pop-up museum this afternoon, organized by the Asian Cultural Experience on Filipinos in Salinas Chinatown and Monterey County. Details:

  • When: Saturday, October 18, 2014, 2:00 pm–5:00 pm Cost: FREE
  • Where: John Steinbeck Library, 350 Lincoln Ave., Salinas, CA
Filipinos in Salinas Chinatown 1920s Wellington Lee Collection

Filipinos in Salinas Chinatown 1920s Wellington Lee Collection

Information from ACE…

Salinas Chinatown was founded by Chinese merchants in 1893. Filipinos first arrived on the California coast on Manila Galleons. During the early 20th century, the 12 square block area was home to many closely-knit Chinese, Japanese, Filipino, Mexican, and African American families. In the 1920s, Filipinos migrated to the Salinas and Pajaro Valleys to work in the agricultural fields, and some settled in or near Chinatown. Another wave of Filipinos migrated to the area following World War II.

This Pop-up Museum (the third in a series focusing on Salinas Chinatown), sponsored by Asian Cultural Experience (A.C.E.), Salinas CA, in collaboration with the John Steinbeck Library, explores the history of Filipinos in Salinas Chinatown, Salinas Valley, and Monterey County, and invites your participation:

  • Are you part of a Filipino family that lived in Chinatown or in Monterey County?
  • Did you have friends in Salinas Chinatown, or did you know any Filipino families in the area?
  • How did you, or do you view the Chinatown community? Did you ever walk or drive through Chinatown, talk to the people, or take photographs? Did you have friends in Chinatown, or do business there?

We invite Salinas and Monterey County residents and visitors to come and share their experiences and knowledge of Salinas Chinatown and the Filipino experience; in the process we will explore our differences as well as our common ground. Bring one or two objects or photographs, and especially your stories, to share with us. For the period of the pop-up, we will provide temporary exhibit space and labels for your items, and people who are interested in hearing your story. We look forward to seeing you!

FANHS Monterey Bay

Photo from FANHS Monterey Bay website

Related Links:

Refraction…water, the iris and solar path lights

This week’s WordPress photo challenge from Kevin Conboy was interesting and definitely a challenge…

For this photo challenge, show us what “refraction” means to you. It could be an image taken in a reflective surface, it could be light bent from behind an object, or it could mean remedial math homework: the choice is completely up to you. I’m looking forward to seeing how you interpret “refraction.”

It seems that light reflecting on water is the easy place to go, and I did have some photos from the Monterey Bay Aquarium that would fit the theme for this challenge.

Monterey Bay Aquarium web

My photo of a snowy egret (a type of heron) posted on the 2014 Monterey Bay Birding Festival article may be relevant for the theme…

The shape of the bill reflected on the water…what do you think?

snowy-egret refraction post

Then there is the refraction on the iris of my grandson Jun’s eyes…

Juns Eyes

When I zoomed in on the iris…I could make out the letter “T” and part of an “A”…and it was a clue to where the photo was taken, at his TaeKwonDo dojang!

This was a tough challenge to interpret, and I can’t wait to see if other WordPress bloggers participating in this challenge posted eye photographs, too.

UPDATE November 13, 2014: After this challenge, I am paying more attention to refracted light…and during an evening walk, noticed these solar lighting patterns that fit the theme.

solar lights

solar lights 3 web

The pumpkin flavor craze — do all these products really contain pumpkin?

Lolas pumpkins photoWhat is up with the proliferation of pumpkin flavor everything?

We expect to see pumpkins — the sort used for Jack-O-Lanterns — outside of grocery stores this time of year.

Lately though, the pumpkin thing continues inside the store…from pumpkin spice yogurt and “limited edition” English muffins. Even the Oreo brand is in with their Pumpkin Spice Creme cookies!

Pumpkins used to be a sign that fall is here, Halloween is around the corner and soon, the Thanksgiving holiday will be upon us.

But now, the pumpkin and “pumpkin spice” signals a time of year when all manner of food and beverages are blanketed with this flavor.  Example:

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And just like Christmas songs and Christmas decorations, it comes to us EARLIER each year.

So why is pumpkin and “pumpkin spice” flavor in so many food and beverage products these days (especially since pumpkin by itself is rather bland)?

Starbucks PSL

Starbuck’s PSL (photo via Starbucks.com)

Turns out we can thank Starbucks for the brilliant idea to offer seasonal beverages, and in particular their best-selling Pumpkin Spice Latte  or “PSL”

For around $5, you can get a 20 oz PSL Venti but only for a “limited time”.

But does the drink actually have real pumpkin? Nope, just pumpkin pie spices like cinnamon, nutmeg and clove.

A brilliant marketing idea, right?  Get people to anticipate a drink (just as we would anticipate the holiday season perhaps) which contains spices that are available all year round!

Here are other pumpkin flavor examples:

The “limited batch” pumpkin yogurt by Chobani, which does contain pumpkin…

The Thomas’ “Limited Edition”  English muffins…which also had pumpkin…

Then there’s the Oreo brand cookie with the prominent pumpkin on the packaging and the words “pumpkin spice creme”…

pumnpkin spice oreo cookies web

Pumpkin Spice Oreo ingredients are: Sugar, Unbleached Enriched Flour (Wheat Flour, Niacin, Reduced Iron, Thiamine, Mononitrate (Vitamin B1) Riboflavin (Vitamin B2), Folic Acid, Palm and/or Canola Oil, High Fructose Corn Syrup, Cornstarch, Salt, Baking Soda, Soy Lecithin, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Artificial Color (Yellow 5 Lake, Red 40 Lake, Blue 3 Lake), Paprika Oleoresin (Color)

Do you see any pumpkin on the ingredients list?  Nope!

From the FoodFacts.com blog on the Pumpkin Spice Oreo

We’d like to call your attention to the fact that there is absolutely NO PUMPKIN anywhere in that list. Oh wait, they’re PUMPKIN SPICE Oreos, not PUMPKIN Oreos.

Technically that would mean that these should taste like nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon and anything else we use to flavor actual pumpkin pie. Funny, we don’t see any of those ingredients on the list either. We do, however, see Natural and Artificial Flavors — which of course is what the folks over at Oreos are using to impart the taste of pumpkin pie spices to the cream inside this cookie.

And then, to make it look authentic (because all of those spices carry a rich, deep color), they’ve added a healthy dose of artificial colors.

There are also pumpkin spice teas, beer and other alcohol beverages….like this pumpkin spice whiskey from Rhode Island-based Sons of Liberty…

This one actually has plenty of locally grown pumpkins and actual pumpkin spices, and sounds good!

Food manufacturers are succeeding with the popular pumpkin spice flavor, so this craze is probably here to stay for a while.   (See the 2013 Nielsen’s graph below showing pumpkin flavor products experiencing tremendous growth).

Nielsen pumpkin flavor chart 2013

So I suppose we can enjoy the fall and all the pumpkin and pumpkin spice stuff out there, especially if you happen to like pumpkin spices (I do!).

Just remember, most will probably NOT have real pumpkin, but hopefully there will at least be REAL pumpkin pie spices.  You just have to look at the labels.

Do you like this proliferation of pumpkin and pumpkin spiced food in the market? Wish it will stay or happy if it’s a fad that will soon fade?

Lolas Turbaned-Squashes photo

Turbaned squashes – photo www.Lolako.com  Click on the photo to find out the difference between a pumpkin, a squash and a gourd.

And by the way, if you want to know the difference between a pumpkin, squash or a gourd, here is the link to my post Autumn Time, Pumpkin Time, with fun photos of many varieties now available…everywhere (just like the pumpkin spice everything).

Even the NPR Car Talk guys made a joke about this pumpkin craze in this morning’s program, mentioning their “pumpkin chai brake fluid”.  Oh well…what’s next?

Further reading: Article from Vox.com:  The greatest trick capitalism ever pulled was making you want a pumpkin spice latte.

Remaining light and the dreamy theme for this week’s WordPress photo challenge

Sometimes, the time of day instantly makes a dreamy atmosphere…

Here is my photo submission for this week’s photo challenge theme, Dreamy, taken with my phone camera near the Moss Landing Marine Lab building (the building with the lights).

Dreamy Photo Challenge wb

My take for this week’s WordPress Photo challenge — photo I took of my grandchildren late in the summer, near the MLM Lab building.

The sun had just set.  The reflection of the colors, and remaining light on the water made me wonder what my grandsons were thinking of — or imagining and dreaming about — as they looked across the water.

The Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) is a marine science research and education facility and the second oldest marine lab on Monterey Bay.  From the MLML website:

The lab is situated in an excellent location for the study of the marine world.

The Monterey Submarine Canyon, the largest such feature on the west coast of North America, begins within a few hundred meters of the Moss Landing harbor and the MLML research fleet.

To the east of MLML is the Elkhorn Slough, the largest tract of tidal salt marsh in California outside of San Francisco Bay, and… continue reading (and to see photos at MLML open house)

To see creative interpretations from WordPress bloggers on this week’s photo challenge theme, click here.

The photo that inspired me to find out what happened to the natural fiber rope trade, once dominated by Philippine “Manila Hemp”

While reading about the 2014 International Coastal Clean-up Day I came across this beach clean-up photo by Kip Evans.

plastic rope debris photo by Kip Evans

The image — and knowing something about ghost nets in our oceans — had me curious about marine trash washed up on the beach and remaining in our oceans, and specifically, when the world switched from using biodegradable natural fiber fish nets and ropes (photos below) to synthetic or plastic, petrochemical-based ropes.

In the process, I learned how the Philippine fiber, abaca, known as “Manila hemp” dominated the natural fiber rope industry starting in the mid 1800’s…

abaca hemp warehouse Manila late 1800s

Traders at abaca warehouse, Manila, Philippines late 1800’s. Bales of abaca are at bottom right of photograph. Photo source: The Philippine Islands by Ramon Reyes Lala via the Gutenberg website, published in 1898 by the Continental Publishing Company.

…and how a material invented in the 1930’s and originally designed as a fabric to replace women’s silk stockings signaled the decline of abaca / Manila hemp as a prime material for the natural rope and cordage industry.

Interested in a bit of history?  Link to the article on Native Leaf’s blog here (The switch from natural fiber abaca, hemp ropes to synthetic ropes).

Related Links:

California the first U.S. state to ban single-use plastic bags

California Flag

The California State Flag, adopted in 1911.

California is the most populous state in the U.S….and its citizens use a whole lot of single-use plastic bags — about 14 billion bags yearly.

Thanks to a new bill signed by Governor Edmund G. Brown today, we can at least dramatically cut our plastic bag use and prevent single-use plastic bags from going into our landfills (since most bags are not recycled) and more important, decrease (and eventually eliminate!) escaped plastic bags that mar our beautiful landscape.

Having a statewide ban protects the environment of the state of California from this needless trash, and now, smaller cities / municipalities do not have to create their own ordinances…it’s done, and the entire state is covered!

The bill — SB 270 — is the nation’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bag.

“This bill is a step in the right direction – it reduces the torrent of plastic polluting our beaches, parks and even the vast ocean itself,” said Governor Brown. “We’re the first to ban these bags, and we won’t be the last.”

More from the Governor’s website:

The legislation, authored by Senator Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), prohibits grocery stores and pharmacies from distributing single-use plastic bags after July 2015 and enacts the same ban for convenience stores and liquor stores the following year. It will also provide up to $2 million in competitive loans – administered by CalRecycle – to businesses transitioning to the manufacture of reusable bags.

…“I applaud Governor Brown for signing SB 270 into law. He continues to lead our state forward with a commitment to sustainability. A throw-away society is not sustainable. This new law will greatly reduce the flow of billions of single-use plastic bags that litter our communities and harm our environment each year. Moving from single-use plastic bags to reusable bags is common sense. Governor Brown’s signature reflects our commitment to protect the environment and reduce government costs,” said Senator Padilla.

California coast from above web

Southern California coastline. Photo LolaKo.com

“The California coast is a national treasure and a calling card for the world, helping us attract visitors and business from around the globe. Removing the harmful blight of single-use plastic bags, especially along our coastline and waterways, helps ensure the kind of clean and healthy environment we need to have a stronger economy and a brighter future,” said Assembly Speaker Toni Atkins.  Continue reading…

This is the start of what will hopefully be a nationwide ban on single-use plastic bags.

California coast web

My grandsons Jun and Gabriel walking on the beach this summer. We spent a lot of time on the beach this summer!

The California coast covers 840 miles (1,350 km), and 15 of California’s 58 counties directly face the Pacific Ocean.  This statewide plastic bag ban is a major step towards protecting our environment and the ocean’s creatures that ingest plastics by accident — like the Pacific leatherback turtle mistaking plastic for jellyfish and other food.

Print

6 degrees pictogram via Ocean Conservancy — No matter where you live, trash can travel from your hands to storm drains to streams and to the sea.

Proud to live in California right now with this first ever statewide plastic bag ban.

I’ll end this post with this quote about the ban from Nathan Weaver of Environment California :

“This important step forward shows that we can achieve lasting victories for ocean and environmental health,” said Nathan Weaver, Oceans Advocate with Environment California. “Nothing we use for a few minutes should pollute our ocean for hundreds of years.”  

Monterey Bay Birding Festival and Family Day Activities September 27th and 28th

Monterey-Bay-Birding-Festival

Monterey Bay is a popular destination for tourists…but did you know it is also home to one of the most spectacular birding and wildlife sites in North America?

September is the best time to see wintering shorebirds and is the peak of fall migration for many bird species…which is why the Monterey Bay Birding Festival is held during the month of September.

The 10th annual Monterey Bay Birding Festival is happening now through Sunday, September 28th. For more about the birding festival, visit the festival’s website, here. Excerpt:

Word Class Birding

From soaring golden eagles, effortlessly gliding California condors, cheeky bushtits, gorgeous Townsend’s warblers, scampering snowy plovers, to thousands of sooty shearwaters streaming along the ocean’s surface, few places can match the diversity of species as the Monterey Bay region.

September marks the peak of fall migration, with wintering shorebirds arriving en masse. Warblers and other passerines are doing the same, and we even start seeing the first appearances of wintering ducks and other waterfowl. Meanwhile, just a few miles offshore, jaegers, shearwaters, and alcid are present in good numbers. There’s no better time to visit the Monterey Bay area to see the greatest number of species or to find a rarity.

Extraordinary Presenters 

This year’s lineup of nightly speakers, headed by author, artist, naturalist and conservationist Kenn Kaufman, simply soars.  Continue reading…

Photo gallery above, my amateur, first attempts at taking photos of shore birds taken at Moss Landing, with my NOT fancy camera.

So far, and as of today, September 26th, 2014, birding festival attendees have spotted most of the birds on this year’s festival checklist.  Wow, and there are still 2 more days to go!.

Birding Festival 2014 bird sightings web

In conjunction with the festival, there are also terrific (and free) family community events happening this weekend including a Habitat Festival and Native Plant Sale organized by the Watsonville Wetlands Watch.

Watsonville Wetlands Watch poster link

For more information on the native plant sale, click on the flyer above, and for more on the nature activities, bird watching and exploration walks for Family Days at the Watsonville’s Nature Center, see / click on the Family Days flyer below or call 831.768-1622.

Family Days poster

Native Leaf will exhibit at the Birder’s marketplace on Friday and Saturday. Visit Native Leaf’s website (news and blog page) for more details on hours and marketplace location.

Spectacular nature photographers (like Ooh Look Photography) as well as authors and artists specializing in exquisite bird, nature and wildlife art are also exhibiting at this year’s marketplace.

Philippine President on Global Security, China and Climate Change

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Photo via Here & Now website: Jeremy Hobson speaks with Philippine President Benigno Aquino III in Boston. (Samantha Fields/Here & Now)

Climate change is a reality.  The Philippines has experienced strange weather patterns over the last few years — typhoons in November / December when they normally end by September.

The November, 2013 Typhoon Haiyan (called “Yolanda” in the Philippines) was the deadliest Philippine typhoon on record and one of the strongest tropical cyclones ever recorded.

The Philippines is a member of the United Nations (UN) Commission on Climate Change, and President Benigno Aquino spoke at the United Nations Climate Summit on September 23, 2014.

The day before he spoke at the Summit, President Aquino was interviewed by Jeremy Hobson on the public radio program Here and Now

In case you missed it, here are links to the broadcast…worth a listen, covering global security and climate change as it relates to the Philippines and the U.S – Philippines relationship.

Interview excerpt:

On the threat of climate change for the Philippines

“If you look at the maps, especially for storms coming from the Pacific side, it seems like we’re a gateway to the rest of Asia.”

“For instance, Typhoon Haiyan. We don’t get typhoons in December. They normally end by September. A typhoon happening in October is considered a late event. Having a major typhoon in December (and this has happened for practically ever year that I’ve been in office) … is truly alarming to us.

“Even the planting cycles, which are really very dependent on weather — there seems to be a return to normal this year — but for the past few years they kept on changing, which affects the food security, not only for us, but for a whole range of other countries.”

Note: If you cannot play President Benigno Aquino’s interview from this page, link to the Here and Now program’s web page, here.

Is lip-pointing a learned or inherited trait? And by the way, it’s not exclusively Filipino…

Western style pointing

My grandson, Gabriel, at the beach, hot cocoa in one hand and the other hand pointing like most…

People living in areas where the index or the “pointer” finger is the norm when pointing may think that this communication method is a universal gesture….but it is not.

According to the paper The Protean Pointing Gesture, lip-pointing — instead of finger-pointing — in one form or another is a method used not just among Filipinos, but also widely used by those living in other parts of Southeast Asia, Australia, the Caribbean, Africa, and South America.

If you know Filipinos and Filipino-Americans who grew up in the Philippines, you will know what I mean by lip-pointing.  If you haven’t seen it, here is a great description from Lisa who blogs at mymovetothePhilippines.com:

Filipino lip pointing is actually more than just a simple puckering up. First there’s eye-to-eye contact, followed by variations of lip pursing, combined with a eyebrow, head and neck action, the execution of which all depends on the intention of the pointer.

Non-Filipinos who have observed this gesture find it confusing, and sometimes hilarious.  Foreigners should be wary of this practice.  A Filipina puckering her lips doesn’t necessarily mean she’s asking for a kiss.  She could just be pointing to something on your shoulder.  She might slap you in the face, if you misinterpret.

One of the most common reasons for lip pointing is to give quick directions, of which explaining verbally would take a longer time.

So, if you’re at a mall, and you ask a Filipino who’s carrying grocery bags up to his arms where the rest room is, he might purse his lips then extend his neck to the direction of the restroom in one smooth action.  Or he would purse his lips, lift his head up, and turn it to his left, which means: walk straight ahead, and make a left turn at the next corner. A head bobble before the head lift would mean pass two aisles down before making a left. If he over extends his neck, bends a bit, and stretches his lips outward, it means you’ve got a farther ways to walk.

According to the study, finger-pointing is one of the first gestures a human baby uses to communicate, even before they can speak.  And this is seen everywhere and across cultures.  So does this mean lip-pointing is something one learns?

Lip Pointing learned or natural webBut if it is also common for people from a particular region of the world to lip-point (e.g., Southeast Asia) then is it possible that lip-pointing is also an inherited trait?

If my U.S.-born grandsons (who are part Filipino) decide to move and live in a country where lip-pointing is common, will they easily convert to this method?

Unfortunately, the question of whether lip pointing is an inherited or a learned behavior is not answered in the study, so we will have to wait for further research.

But what do you think…learned or inherited? After all, it is not easy to teach someone how to lip-point.

Speaking of more research, can they can also find out why Filipinos and Thais sniff kiss?

Philippine narket web

Scene from market in the Philippines. Hands full? No need to drop those market bags right away since you can just let the vendor know you want by lip-pointing.

I do wonder if modern Filipinos point less with their lips, and like the rest of the so-called WEIRD (Western Educated Industrialized Rich Democratic) societies, switch exclusively to pointing with their index finger.  I hope not, as I find lip-pointing an endearing Filipino trait, and one I hope is kept by modern and future Filipinos.

For a funny take on Filipino lip-pointing, check out this YouTube video and Auntie Advice from the HappySlip Channel.

Unless with family, I rarely point with my lips now, compared to when I first immigrated to the U.S…so yes, I now point the WEIRD way.

If you are Filipino living outside the Philippines, do you still lip-point?

And another clip on YouTube featuring the Filipino-American comedian Jo-Koy talking about his 3 1/2 year old and his lip-pointing Filipina mother…

And oh wow, just in time for the 2014 Holiday Black Friday shopping, see this Wal-Mart ad targeting Asian Americans — specifically one in Tagalish featuring an actor who…yes indeed… points with his lips.